FRENCH BUFFET

The French BuffetImage result for images of french buffets from crown and colony antiquesBuffets, credenzas and sideboards share a similar purpose in the dining room. These three pieces of furniture are all similar in function and appearance, and the terms are used to describe furniture used for serving, storage and display.

Certain defining characteristics may help distinguish one from the other, but in many cases, the furniture won’t feature all these elements. What really makes each piece different is its history.   This type of furniture is versatile enough that is is not always used in the dining room, making it a practical purchase.

The Credenza

What distinguishes a credenza is a long, low profile, narrow cabinet with multiple storage compartments and a flat top. Usually made from wood, credenzas originally had no legs or feet; instead, they were just cabinets that rested directly on the floor.antique-sideboard-cville

Historically, credenzas played an important role in the dining quarters of kings or high-ranking noblemen. The word “credenza” is the Italian equivalent of “credence,” or “truth,” and the food placed on the piece had to be taste-tested to ensure it wasn’t poisoned.  A food taster Image result for images of a food taster to the kingwas the person who ingested the food which would be served to confirm that it was safe to eat. One who tests drink in this way was known as a cupbearer.

The Buffet

The French term “buffet” translates literally as “sideboard.” The word is also closely associated with a self-serve meal spread out buffet-style on a long, narrow table. The origins of the buffet table go back to 16th century Swedish schnapps tables holding the pre-dinner spirits. By the 18th century, schnapps tables evolved into the smorgasbord table, in which food and drinks were laid out for guests. Buffets typically have some type of cabinets or drawers for storage and a flat surface for food and decor.

THE SIDEBOARDRelated image

The long, narrow profile of a sideboard makes it practically identical to a credenza and a buffet.  Sideboards  comprised of cabinets and, sometimes, drawers. When a sideboard has legs, they tend to be shorter and thicker in size like the one pictured above. Sideboards were first used in late 18th century England, when designer Robert Adams constructed a three-part dining ensemble that included an oblong table centered between two pedestal cupboards resting on urns. The sideboards displayed the finest serving ware in the household, typically silver and fine china.Related image

Our French culinary shop, Aubergine Antiques, carries many many styles of “enfilades” (the French word for buffet or sideboard) as does our garden and architectural antique shop, RF Antiques, and our hub shop Crown and Colony Antiques.

Please visit us online to have a first viewing of our selection and then come visit us to see in person!!  http://www.crownandcolony.com

Visit the website through the link provided and then click on Buffets & Sideboards and for NEW CONTAINER items, click on What’s New.

We just received a NEW FRENCH CONTAINER.  Our shops are filled with not only sideboards, but all sorts of wonderful antiques at EVERY price point.  Please make it a point to visit us before the holidays.  Let one of our qualified employees assist you with making the perfect purchase.

Au Revoir!  A La Prochaine!!

 

 

BISTRO TABLES

Image result for image of family owned french bistro

BISTREAU, from the French western dialect, meaning innkeeper.

A bistro or bistrot /bi-stro/, is, in its original Parisian incarnation, a small restaurant, serving moderately priced simple meals in a modest setting. Bistros are defined mostly by the foods they serve. French home-style cooking, and slow-cooked foods like cassoulet a bean stew, are typical.

The word may have originated from the Russian word bystro, “quickly”. It entered the French language during the Battle of Paris in 1814.  Russian officers who wanted to be served quickly would shout “bystro“.

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French Prayer Chair

PRAYER CHAIR or PRIE DIEU

A priedieu (French: literally, “pray [to] God”, plural priedieux) is a type of prayer desk primarily intended for private devotional use, but may also be found in churches. … The priedieu appears not to have received its present name until the early 17th century.  It is intended to be knelt on where one can place a book or their elbows for prayer.

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FRENCH WINE TABLES

  Wine and Cheese in France – It’s more than just eating and drinking….

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Image result for images of french wine tables in use

Cheese and wine are absolutely central elements of the French diet and French food. In France, traditionally, people eat a warm meal in the middle of the day and then a lighter (often cold) meal in the evening. This food tradition coincides with the French philosophy of shutting everything down in the middle of the day for a well-deserved break. Children go home from school and adults go home to eat lunch together. This is gradually changing, but in general you will find this to be true when you visit France.

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FRENCH Commodes Vs. ITALIAN Commodes

 

French Commodes and Italian Commodes – a short comparison.

Image result for images of tortoise and shell inlay in classic french commodes

chest bedroom xjpg italian chest of drawers commode late 17th century

Italian classic and French classic, have distinct and unique features that set the designs apart.

 

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